Posts Tagged ‘justin lin’

It’s been a busy month for me due to school projects, videography, celebrating Giant’s World Series win and trying to stay up to watch at least one episode a night of the new TVB Chinese Drama, No Regrets, AKA 巾幗梟雄之義海豪情 (which BTW is very addicting).  TVB Drama

This week I started thinking, how many filmmakers out there can really make a good living by making films or videography?  With the recession going on, competitions are tough in LA and the Bay Area is also catching up.  Maybe moving to Central America is a better choice for less competition?  There are the disadvantage and advantage staying in California for film and videography, while competition is tough in the film industry down in LA, videography and television broadcasting are also tough in the Bay Area.

Being the Bay Area lover that I am, I love to do both videography and film. In terms of videography, especially for weddings, I don’t look for the big cash.  Ok I lied, I do look for the cash, but the biggest pay off for me doing videography is being appreciated for what I’ve done for my clients by making their videos look good, which is stupid of me for thinking JUST that because I am a hungry and poor student filmmaker who needs more money in order to buy more equipments, so why shouldn’t money be first priority?  I guess that’s how I roll….  THIS is where my weakness and disadvantage kicks in because I haven’t done a whole lot of videography until just this recent year and I tend to do videos for my friends and clients  for a really low amount or for “free” just so that I can have THAT experience. Cuz in the future I can start charging $2,000+ as I gain more experience, but for now I am playing cheap Chinese guy where I’m charging clients for only $50 to $300 per event or get fed a scrumcious meal because at this economic time no one is willing to pay that much unless they are big corporate companies.  So how long does it take til I can actually charge $15,000 per wedding like these guys??

Stillmotion:         http://www.vimeo.com/12676236

Despite not being able to earn as much, I like to get paid in order to pay my crews for their hard work.  Even if they volunteer, it’s only good manner that you use that money to feed them at least.  REMEMBER, a happy crew = good films.

My awesome crew in our Interpretation's Choice Made

While I love doing videography and film while not having to worry about budget too much, being a student SUCKS because my time isn’t too flexible when I have class 4 days + part time job out of the week.  Also, being a poor student filmmaker that I am, if I don’t get reimburse for materials from the videography jobs I do, I’ll just lose more and more money.  Tapes sure are getting expensive these days >.<“

But I understand how a lot of student filmmakers feel.  “If I don’t take this job, there may not be another chance”.  While that statement is true on some level, I just feel that it’s only right to get school out of hair so when you graduate you will have all the time to focus on a film or video and that’s when all the networking comes together.  Of all the videography jobs I’ve done so far, I am not even close in paying off my camera or even have money to buy new equipments.  Sooner or later you will see me out on the street with a sign that says, “Hungry Filmmaker, Will Film For Food”.  JUST LIKE THIS GUY! —>

But I wouldn’t mind filming just for food, it’s basically what I’m currently doing now, I volunteer to help out a film shoot and I get fed, which is always a good thing.  Sooner or later I’ll be able to earn that $15,000 per video, just as long as I get out of SFSU in Spring woohoo!!  And if Justin Lin would ever want me to help him work on a Fast & the Furious project, as long as I get roomed comfortably and fed, I don’t mind working on the set for free.  Then again I’m sure someone like Justin are the type of guys who would at least compensate or pay a little just to keep crew members happy.  (Fast Five is DONE and launching in April 2011!!!) GO JUSTIN!

Final Cut Pro: $700
Shotgun mic: $250
Glidecam Stabilizer: $2,400
Canon 5D MK II: $3,000
My desire to make a good film: More expensive than you can imagine.
My kindness and generosity to help you out: priceless

So recently I’ve been reading the new issue of Hyphen Magazine and I just love these writers!  They have so much to share and it goes beyond more than just mere delight of a daily read or entertainment.  As I keep reading these articles of regarding Asian American music, film, events, history, emerging artist, aspiring filmmakers and culture, I’ve learned so much more on the people they highlight, Asian cultures and the stories of these hidden yet successful Asians/Asian Americans.  Yup that’s right…HIDDEN or lesser known.  Often times you don’t hear much about successful Asian Americans in the U.S.  Maybe famous Asian Americans in the entertainment media industry like Justin Lin, Grace Park, WongFu Production, but nowhere else would you hear news like awesome Ukulele player Jake Shimabukuro, Hard working filmmaker James Z. Feng, or the history of Laos and their current situation.  Visit their site for the magazine preview and if you love their articles, I encourage everyone to subscribe to them because their articles ROCK! http://www.hyphenmagazine.com/magazine/current

Jake jamming like there’s no tomorrow [Photo by Aaron Yoshino]

Though some still have trouble pronouncing his last name and the instrument he plays, Jake Shimabukuro (she-ma-BOO-koo-row) is recognized as one of the world’s most exciting and innovative ukulele (oo-koo-LAY-lay) players and composers. From a modest beginning performing at a local Honolulu café, Jake has gone on to play renowned and popular venues and festivals across the world. This past summer Jake added Sweden, Finland, France, Spain, and Brazil to the list of countries he’s performed in. Occasional tours with Jimmy Buffett & The Coral Reefer Band have broadened Jake’s experience, regularly exposing his virtuosity and charming stage presence to crowds of up to 50,000. Speaking of large audiences, Jake has also performed on national television shows such as NBC’s The Late Show with Conan O’Brien, The Today Show, and Last Call With Carson Daly, as well been featured on NPR’s Morning Edition and World Café, Public Radio International’s The World, Sirius/XM’s The Bob Edwards Show, and others.  Energy, imagination, and innovation have been Jake’s keys to success. He plans to continue recording, performing, collaborating, and staying happy. “I love what I do. I’m forever thankful for music.”

Check out and subscribe to Jake’s Youtube Channel @ http://www.youtube.com/jakeshimabukuro
Official site: http://www.jakeshimabukuro.com


Shin-B Kim

Writer Mitchell Kuga from Hyphen wrote an article on a Q&A session with Korean American MC Rapper, Shin-B Kim, and one of the most encouraging words from her about giving advice for other Asian American female rappers breaking into the industry was, “You have to learn to ignore the negativity and surround yourself with good people who will uplift you and give you constructive criticism. Don’t downplay yourself just because you’re an Asian female. If you want to be taken seriously, you have to have confidence that you’re just as good as any male, possibly better.” – Shin-B Kim.

Shin-B Kim Raised in the heart of Koreatown Los Angeles, she grew up as a tomboy playing basketball and eventually, rhyming in mini cyphers with her close male friends. She is a female hip hop MC from LA. She’s performed all throughout the States and toured Korea. She was featured as the main headliner for a widely syndicated radio program in Korea called MBC Music Camp Radio, hosted by the legendary Bae Chul Soo. She has performed with an array of Korean celebrities from hip hop duo, Bae Chi Gi to pop singers, Chae Yeon and Clon. She is featured on Korea’s elite hip hop site, Hiphopplaya.com.
Be sure to visit Shin-B’s Official Site
http://www.shin-b.com/

OH! Lastly, I’ve also learned that Fried Rice doesn’t necessarily mean rice is included. LOL~

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